Almost 14 years to the day after the release of her debut album Solo Star, Solange is on the top of the music game thanks to the success of her third studio album A Seat At The Table. In the latest issue Interview, we read Solange being interviewed by her biggest fan… her big sister Beyonce.

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During the candid conversation between the sisters they discussed A Seat at the Table, spefically “Cranes in the Sky”

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BEYONCÉ: What does the song title “Cranes in the Sky” mean?

SOLANGE:

“Cranes in the Sky” is actually a song that I wrote eight years ago. It’s the only song on the album that I wrote independently of the record, and it was a really rough time. I know you remember that time. I was just coming out of my relationship with Julez’s father. We were junior high school sweethearts, and so much of your identity in junior high is built on who you’re with. You see the world through the lens of how you identify and have been identified at that time.

So I really had to take a look at myself, outside of being a mother and a wife, and internalize all of these emotions that I had been feeling through that transition. I was working through a lot of challenges at every angle of my life, and a lot of self-doubt, a lot of pity-partying. And I think every woman in her twenties has been there—where it feels like no matter what you are doing to fight through the thing that is holding you back, nothing can fill that void. I used to write and record a lot in Miami during that time, when there was a real estate boom in America, and developers were developing all of this new property. There was a new condo going up every ten feet. You recorded a lot there as well, and I think we experienced Miami as a place of refuge and peace. We weren’t out there wilin’ out and partying.

I remember looking up and seeing all of these cranes in the sky. They were so heavy and such an eyesore, and not what I identified with peace and refuge. I remember thinking of it as an analogy for my transition—this idea of building up, up, up that was going on in our country at the time, all of this excessive building, and not really dealing with what was in front of us. And we all know how that ended. That crashed and burned. It was a catastrophe. And that line came to me because it felt so indicative of what was going on in my life as well. And, eight years later, it’s really interesting that now, here we are again, not seeing what’s happening in our country, not wanting to put into perspective all of these ugly things that are staring us in the face.

The pair goes really deep into the pair growing up in Houston and have a very interesting “this or that” about Dianna Ross films. Read it all here.

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About The Author Tatyana Jenene

Birds in the Trap Sing Aaron Hall.

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